FAQ

What is the “10 day rule” in federal law that requires states to report suspensions or revocations of CDL?

There are two “10 day windows” or “10 day rules” in this area of the law. First, there is federal law that requires states to report revocations or suspension of commercial driver’s licenses within 10 days to the Secretary of Transportation. 49 U.S.C. § 31311(a)(8) states, “Not later than 10 days after disqualifying the holder of a commercial driver's license from operating a commercial motor vehicle (or after revoking, suspending, or canceling the license) for at least 60 days, the State shall notify the Secretary or the operator of the information system under section 31309 of this title, as the case may be, and the State that issued the license, of the disqualification, revocation, suspension, or cancellation, and the violation that resulted in the disqualification, revocation, suspension, or cancellation shall be recorded. The penalty for non compliance with provision can be “having amounts withheld from apportionment under section 31314 of this title.”  An important note, the 10 days under this subsection starts from the “disqualifying the holder of a commercial driver's license from operating a commercial motor vehicle” and not from the point of conviction.

The second, “10 day window” or “10 day rule” is under subsection (9) of 49 U.S.C. § 31311(a). It deals specifically with drivers that are convicted of a qualifying offense and are license holders from another state. Subsection 9 states, “If an individual violates a State or local law on motor vehicle traffic control (except a parking violation) and the individual - (A) has a commercial driver's license issued by another State; or (B) is operating a commercial vehicle without a commercial driver's license and has a driver's license issued by another State, the State in which the violation occurred shall notify a State official designated by the issuing State of the violations not later than 10 days after the date the individual is found to have committed the violation.” The report of the conviction should start an administrative process for the CDL holder in the licensing state, however, Iowa Code 321.205 authorizes a suspension or revocation, “Upon receiving notice of the conviction of the resident in another state for an offense which, if committed in this state, would be grounds for the suspension or revocation of the license or disqualification of the person from operating a commercial motor vehicle.” It is not clear whether this suspension or revocation would be preceded by an administrative hearing to determine if the person identified in the conviction is the same person licensed in Iowa, see Appendix G.

How quickly following a qualified conviction must the state suspend or revoke a CDL license?

Pursuant to 49 C.F.R. § 384.231, which identifies the minimum required standards for substantial compliance, the state must “disqualify a driver as expeditiously as possible.” Therefore, there is not a specified timeline for the court to submit conviction to the instate CDL licensing body. 

How much money can be withheld from the state for non-compliance?

49 C.F.R. §384.401 authorizes the withholding in the first year of non-compliance of an “amount up to 5 percent of the Federal-aid highway funds required to be apportioned to any State.” In the second and subsequent years, that amount can be increased to an amount up to 10 percent. The Code section is in Appendix B of this report.

What offenses require the suspension/revocation of a CDL and for how long?

The offenses which require suspension and/or revocation of a CDL are listed in 49 C.F.R. §383.51. The term of the suspension and/or revocation is also itemized. Due to its length, 49 C.F.R. §383.51 is Appendix A of this FAQ. There are two important things to note about 49 C.F.R. §383.51. First, CDL license holders are exposed to suspensions and or revocations of their CDL for offense that may occur while operating a non-commercial motor vehicle, such as a personal car or motorcycle. Second, a State may reinstate any driver disqualified for life for some specified after 10 years if that person has voluntarily entered and successfully completed an appropriate rehabilitation program approved by the State. The Code section is in Appendix C of this report.

What duties or responsibilities does the holder of a CDL have following a conviction?

Pursuant to 49 C.F.R. § 383.31, a CDL driver must within 30 days of a conviction for violating, in any type of motor vehicle, a State or local law relating to motor vehicle traffic control (other than a parking violation) in a State or jurisdiction other than the one which issued his/her license, shall notify an official designated by the State or jurisdiction which issued such license, of such conviction. That person must also notify their employer. An important note, this provision does not apply if the conviction happened in the state that issued the CDL license. See Appendix D

What person or entity in Iowa is responsible with the reporting requirements of 49 U.S.C. § 31311(a)(8) and 49 C.F.R. §383.51. 

Federal law leaves it to the states to determine who is responsible to report offenses as required under 49 C.F.R. §383.51. Iowa Code § 321.204 mandates that the Department of Transportation must “notify the commercial driver's license information system and the commercial motor vehicle administrator in the licensing state, if applicable, of the disqualification of a commercial driver within ten days of any of the following:

a.  The disqualification of the commercial driver under section 321.208 if the disqualification is for sixty days or more.

b. The suspension or revocation of a commercial driver's license if the suspension or revocation is for sixty days or more.

c. The cancellation of a commercial driver's license.

Notably, it does not define the timeframe for the notification process. See Appendix E for the specific statutory language.

Appendix A

Minimum standards for substantial compliance by states

§ 384.231Satisfaction of State disqualification requirement. (a) Applicability. The provisions of §§384.203, 384.206(b), 384.210, 384.213, 384.215 through 384.219, 384.221 through 384.224, and 384.231 of this part apply to the State of licensure of the person affected by the provision. The provisions of §384.210 of this part also apply to any State to which a person makes application for a transfer CDL. (b) Required action—(1) CDL holders. A State must satisfy the requirement of this part that the State disqualify a person who holds a CDL by, at a minimum, suspending, revoking, or canceling the person's CDL for the applicable period of disqualification. (2) A person required to have a CDL. A State must satisfy the requirement of this subpart that the State disqualify a person required to have a CDL who is convicted of an offense or offenses necessitating disqualification under §383.51 of this subchapter. At a minimum, the State must implement the limitation on licensing provisions of §384.210 and the timing and recordkeeping requirements of paragraphs (c) and (d) of this section so as to prevent such a person from legally obtaining a CDL from any State during the applicable disqualification period(s) specified in this subpart. (c) Required timing. The State must disqualify a driver as expeditiously as possible. (d) Recordkeeping requirements. The State must conform to the requirements of the CDLIS State Procedures Manual (incorporated by reference in § 384.107(b).) These requirements include the maintenance of such driver records and driver identification data on the CDLIS as the FMCSA finds are necessary to the implementation and enforcement of the disqualifications called for in §§384.215 through 384.219, and 384.221 through 384.224 of this part.

Appendix B

Consequences of state noncompliance

49 C.F.R. §384.401 Withholding of funds based on noncompliance.

(a)Following the first year of noncompliance. An amount up to 5 percent of the Federal-aid highway funds required to be apportioned to any State under each of sections 104(b)(1), (b)(3), and (b)(4) of title 23 U.S.C. shall be withheld from a State on the first day of the fiscal year following such State’s first year of noncompliance under this part.

(b) Following second and subsequent year(s) of noncompliance. An amount up to 10 percent of the Federal-aid highway funds required to be apportioned to any State under each of sections 104(b)(1), (b)(3), and (b)(4) of title 23 U.S.C. shall be withheld from a State on the first day of the fiscal year following such State’s second or subsequent year(s) of noncompliance under this part.

Appendix C

Driver disqualifications and penalties

§383.51 Disqualification of drivers.

(a) General. (1) A driver or holder of a CDL who is disqualified must not drive a CMV.
(a)(2) An employer must not knowingly allow, require, permit, or authorize a driver who is disqualified to drive a CMV.
(a)(3) A driver is subject to disqualification sanctions designated in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section, if the holder of a CDL drives a CMV or non-CMV and is convicted of the violations.
(a)(4) Determining first and subsequent violations. For purposes of determining first and subsequent violations of the offenses specified in this subpart, each conviction for any offense listed in Tables 1 through 4 to this section resulting from a separate incident, whether committed in a CMV or non-CMV, must be counted.
(a)(5) Reinstatement after lifetime disqualification. A State may reinstate any driver disqualified for life for offenses described in paragraphs (1) through (b)(8) of this section (Table 1 to §383.51) after 10 years if that person has voluntarily entered and successfully completed an appropriate rehabilitation program approved by the State. Any person who has been reinstated in accordance with this provision and who is subsequently convicted of a disqualifying offense described in paragraphs (b)(1) through (b)(8) of this section (Table 1 to §383.51) must not be reinstated.
(b) Disqualification for major offenses. Table 1 to §383.51 contains a list of the offenses and periods for which a driver must be disqualified, depending upon the type of vehicle the driver is operating at the time of the violation, as follows:

Table 1 to §383.51

If a driver operates a motor vehicle and is convicted of:

For a first conviction or refusal to be tested while operating a CMV, a person required to have a CDL holder must be disqualified from operating a CMV for

For a first conviction or refusal to be tested while operating a non-CMV, a CDL holder must be disqualified from operating a CMV for

For a first conviction or refusal to be tested while operating a CMV transporting hazardous materials required to be placarded under the Hazardous Materials Regulations (49 CFR part 172, subpart F), a person required to have a CDL and CDL holder must be disqualified from operating a CMV for

For a second conviction or refusal to be tested in a separate incident of any combination of offenses in this Table while operating a CMV, a person required to have a CDL and a CDL holder must be disqualified from operating a CMV for

For a second conviction or refusal to be tested in a separate incident of any combination of offenses in this Table while operating a non-CMV, a CDL holder must be disqualified from operating a CMV for

(1) Being under the influence of alcohol as prescribed by State law.

1 year

1 year

3 years

Life

Life

(2) Being under the influence of a controlled substance.

1 year

1 year

3 years

Life

Life

(3) Having an alcohol concentration of 0.04 or greater while operating a CMV

1 year

Not applicable

3 years

Life

Not applicable

(4) Refusing to take an alcohol test as required by a State or jurisdiction under its implied consent laws or regulations as defined in §383.72 of this part.

1 year

1 year

3 years

Life

Life

(5) Leaving the scene of an accident.

1 year

1 year

3 years

Life

Life

(6) Using the vehicle to commit a felony other than a felony described in paragraph (b)(9) of this table.

1 year

1 year

3 years

Life

Life

(7) Driving a CMV when, as a result of prior violations committed operating a CMV, the driver’s CDL is revoked, suspended, or canceled, or the driver is disqualified from operating a CMV.

1 year

Not applicable

3 years

Life

Not applicable

(8) Causing a fatality through the negligent operation of a CMV, including but not limited to the crimes of motor vehicle manslaughter, homicide by motor vehicle and negligent homicide.

1 year

Not applicable

3 years

Life

Not applicable

(9) Using the vehicle in the commission of a felony involving manufacturing, distributing, or dispensing a controlled substance.

Life-not eligible for 10-year reinstatement.

Life-not eligible for 10-year reinstatement.

Life-not eligible for 10-year reinstatement.

Life-not eligible for 10-year reinstatement.

Life-not eligible for 10-year reinstatement.

(c) Disqualification for serious traffic violations. Table 2 to §383.51 contains a list of the offenses and the periods for which a driver must be disqualified, depending upon the type of vehicle the driver is operating at the time of the violation, as follows:

Table 2 to §383.51

1Any individual who provides proof to the enforcement authority that issued the citation, by the date the individual must appear in court or pay any fine for such a violation, that the individual held a valid CDL on the date the citation was issued, shall not be guilty of this offense.

2Driving, for the purpose of this disqualification, means operating a commercial motor vehicle, with the motor running, including while temporarily stationary because of traffic, a traffic control device, or other momentary delays. Driving does not include operating a commercial motor vehicle with or without the motor running when the driver has moved the vehicle to the side of, or off, a highway, as defined in 49 CFR 390.5, and has halted in a location where the vehicle can safely remain stationary.

If the driver operates a motor vehicle and is convicted of:

For a second conviction of any combination of offenses in this Table in a separate incident within a 3-year period while operating a CMV, a person required to have a CDL and a CDL holder must be disqualified from operating a CMV for

For a second conviction of any combination of offenses in this Table in a separate incident within a 3-year period while operating a non-CMV, a CDL holder must be disqualified from operating a CMV, if the conviction results in the revocation, cancellation, or suspension of the CDL holder’s license or non-CMV driving privileges, for

For a third or subsequent conviction of any combination of offenses in this Table in a separate incident within a 3-year period while operating a CMV, a person required to have a CDL and a CDL holder must be disqualified from operating a CMV for

For a third or subsequent conviction of any combination of offenses in this Table in a separate incident within a 3-year period while operating a non-CMV, a CDL holder must be disqualified from operating a CMV, if the conviction results in the revocation, cancellation, or suspension of the CDL holder’s license or non-CMV driving privileges, for

(1) Speeding excessively, involving any speed of 24.1 kmph (15 mph) or more above the posted speed limit.

60 days

60 days

120 days

120 days

(2) Driving recklessly, as defined by State or local law or regulation, including but, not limited to, offenses of driving a motor vehicle in willful or wanton disregard for the safety of persons or property.

60 days

60 days

120 days

120 days

(3) Making improper or erratic traffic lane changes.

60 days

60 days

120 days

120 days

(4) Following the vehicle ahead too closely.

60 days

60 days

120 days

120 days

(5) Violating State or local law relating to motor vehicle traffic control (other than a parking violation) arising in connection with a fatal accident.

60 days

60 days

120 days

120 days

(6) Driving a CMV without obtaining a CDL.

60 days

Not applicable

120 days

Not applicable

(7) Driving a CMV without a CDL in the driver’s possession1.

60 days

Not applicable

120 days

Not applicable

(8) Driving a CMV without the proper class of CDL and/or endorsements for the specific vehicle group being operated or for the passengers or type of cargo being transported.

60 days

Not applicable

120 days

Not applicable

(9) Violating a State or local law or ordinance on motor vehicle traffic control prohibiting texting while driving.

60 days

Not applicable

120 days

Not applicable

(d) Disqualification for railroad-highway grade crossing offenses. Table 3 to §383.51 contains a list of the offenses and the periods for which a driver must be disqualified, when the driver is operating a CMV at the time of the violation, as follows:

Table 3 to §383.51

If a driver is convicted of operating a CMV in violation of a Federal, State or local law because

For a first conviction a person required to have a CDL and a CDL holder must be disqualified from operating a CMV for

For a second conviction of any combination of offenses in this Table in a separate incident within a 3-year period a person required to have a CDL and a CDL holder must be disqualified from operating a CMV for

For a third or subsequent conviction of any combination of offenses in this Table in a separate incident within a 3-year period a person required to have a CDL and a CDL holder must be disqualified from operating a CMV for

(1) The driver is not required to always stop, but fails to slow down and check that tracks are clear of an approaching train.

No less than 60 days

No less than 120 days

No less than 1 year.

(2) The driver is not required to always stop, but fails to stop before reaching the crossing, if the tracks are not clear.

No less than 60 days

No less than 120 days

No less than 1 year.

(3) The driver is always required to stop, but fails to stop before driving onto the crossing.

No less than 60 days

No less than 120 days

No less than 1 year.

(4) The driver fails to have sufficient space to drive completely through the crossing without stopping.

No less than 60 days

No less than 120 days

No less than 1 year.

(5) The driver fails to obey a traffic control device or the directions of an enforcement official at the crossing.

No less than 60 days

No less than 120 days

No less than 1 year.

(6) The driver fails to negotiate a crossing because of insufficient undercarriage clearance.

No less than 60 days

No less than 120 days

No less than 1 year.

(e) Disqualification for violating out-of-service orders. Table 4 to §383.51 contains a list of the offenses and periods for which a driver must be disqualified when the driver is operating a CMV at the time of the violation, as follows:

Table 4 to §383.51

If a driver operates a CMV and is convicted of

For a first conviction while operating a CMV, a person required to have a CDL and a CDL holder must be disqualified from operating a CMV for

For a second conviction in a separate incident within a 10-year period while operating a CMV, a person required to have a CDL and a CDL holder must be disqualified from operating a CMV for

For a third or subsequent conviction in a separate incident within a 10-year period while operating a CMV, a person required to have a CDL and a CDL holder must be disqualified from operating a CMV for

(1) Violating a driver or vehicle out-of-service order while transporting nonhazardous materials.

No less than 180 days or more than 1 year.

No less than 2 years or more than 5 years.

No less than 3 years or more than 5 years.

(2) Violating a driver or vehicle out-of-service order while transporting hazardous materials required to be placarded under part 172, subpart F of this title, or while operating a vehicle designed to transport 16 or more passengers, including the driver.

No less than 180 days or more than 2 years.

No less than 3 years or more than 5 years.

No less than 3 years or more than 5 years.

[52 FR 20587, June 1, 1987, as amended at 53 FR 39050, Oct. 4, 1988; 54 FR 40788, Oct. 3, 1989; 55 FR 6727, Feb. 26, 1990; 57 FR 53295, Nov. 9, 1992; 59 FR 26028, May 18, 1994; 62 FR 37151, July 11, 1997; 64 FR 48111, September 2, 1999; 67 FR 49756-49759, July 31, 2002; 72 FR 36788, July 5, 2007; 75 FR 59134, Sep. 27, 2010]

Appendix D

Notification requirements and employer responsibilities

49 C.F.R. § 383.31 Notification of convictions for driver violations.(a) Each person who operates a commercial motor vehicle, who has a commercial driver's license issued by a State or jurisdiction, and who is convicted of violating, in any type of motor vehicle, a State or local law relating to motor vehicle traffic control (other than a parking violation) in a State or jurisdiction other than the one which issued his/her license, shall notify an official designated by the State or jurisdiction which issued such license, of such conviction. The notification must be made within 30 days after the date that the person has been convicted.(b) Each person who operates a commercial motor vehicle, who has a commercial driver's license issued by a State or jurisdiction, and who is convicted of violating, in any type of motor vehicle, a State or local law relating to motor vehicle traffic control (other than a parking violation), shall notify his/her current employer of such conviction. The notification must be made within 30 days after the date that the person has been convicted. If the driver is not currently employed, he/she must notify the State or jurisdiction which issued the license according to §383.31(a). (c) Notification. The notification to the State official and employer must be made in writing and contain the following information: (1) Driver's full name;(2) Driver's license number;(3) Date of conviction;(4) The specific criminal or other offense(s), serious traffic violation(s), and other violation(s) of State or local law relating to motor vehicle traffic control, for which the person was convicted and any suspension, revocation, or cancellation of certain driving privileges which resulted from such conviction(s);(5) Indication whether the violation was in a commercial motor vehicle;(6) Location of offense; and(7) Driver's signature.

Appendix E

Iowa Code § 321.204  (2010)

321.204  Certification of conviction -- notification of commercial driver's license disqualification.

1.  The department is authorized, upon receiving a record of the conviction in this state of a nonresident operator of a motor vehicle for any offense under the motor vehicle laws of this state, to forward a certified written or electronic record of the conviction to the motor vehicle administrator in the licensing state.

2.  The department shall notify the commercial driver's license information system and the commercial motor vehicle administrator in the licensing state, if applicable, of the disqualification of a commercial driver within ten days of any of the following:

a.  The disqualification of the commercial driver under section 321.208 if the disqualification is for sixty days or more.

b.  The suspension or revocation of a commercial driver's license if the suspension or revocation is for sixty days or more.

c.  The cancellation of a commercial driver's license.

Appendix F

Iowa Code § 321C.1  (2010)

321C.1  Power to enter into compact -- terms.

The director of transportation may enter into drivers license compacts with other jurisdictions in substantially the following form and the contracting states agree:

1.  Article I -- Findings and declaration of policy.

a.  The party states find that:

(1)  The safety of their streets and highways is materially affected by the degree of compliance with state laws and local ordinances relating to the operation of motor vehicles.

(2)  Violation of such a law or ordinance is evidence that the violator engages in conduct which is likely to endanger the safety of persons and property.

(3)  The continuance in force of a license to drive is predicated upon compliance with laws and ordinances relating to the operation of motor vehicles, in whichever jurisdiction the vehicle is operated.

b.  It is the policy of each of the party states to:

(1)  Promote compliance with the laws, ordinances, and administrative rules and regulations relating to the operation of motor vehicles by their operators in each of the jurisdictions where such operators drive motor vehicles.

(2)  Make the reciprocal recognition of licenses to drive and eligibility therefore more just and equitable by considering the overall compliance with motor vehicle laws, ordinances and administrative rules and regulations as a condition precedent to the continuance or issuance of any license by reason of which the licensee is authorized or permitted to operate a motor vehicle in any of the party states.

2.  Article II -- Definitions.  As used in this compact:

a.  "State" means a state, territory or possession of the United States, the District of Columbia, or the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico.

b.  "Home state" means the state which has issued and has the power to suspend or revoke the use of the license or permit to operate a motor vehicle.

c.  "Conviction" means a conviction of any offense related to the use or operation of a motor vehicle which is prohibited by state law, municipal ordinance or administrative rule or regulation, or a forfeiture of bail, bond or other security deposited to secure appearance by a person charged with having committed any such offense, and which conviction or forfeiture is required to be reported to the licensing authority.

3.  Article III -- Reports of conviction.  The licensing authority of a party state shall report each conviction of a person from another party state occurring within its jurisdiction to the licensing authority of the home state of the licensee. Such report shall clearly identify the person convicted; describe the violation specifying the section of the statute, code or ordinance violated; identify the court in which action was taken; indicate whether a plea of guilty or not guilty was entered, or the conviction was a result of the forfeiture of bail, bond or other security; and shall include any special findings made in connection therewith.

4.  Article IV -- Effect of conviction.

a.  The licensing authority in the home state, for the purposes of suspension, revocation or limitation of the license to operate a motor vehicle, shall give the same effect to the conduct reported, pursuant to article III of this compact, as it would if such conduct had occurred in the home state, in the case of convictions for:

(1)  Manslaughter or negligent homicide resulting from the operation of a motor vehicle.

(2)  Driving a motor vehicle while under the influence of intoxicating liquor or a narcotic drug, or under the influence of any other drug to a degree which renders the driver incapable of safely driving a motor vehicle.

(3)  Any felony in the commission of which a motor vehicle is used.

(4)  Failure to stop and render aid in the event of a motor vehicle accident resulting in the death or personal injury of another.

b.  As to other convictions, reported pursuant to article III, the licensing authority in the home state shall give such effect to the conduct as is provided by the laws of the home state.

c.  If the laws of a party state do not provide for offenses or violations denominated or described in precisely the words employed in paragraph "a" of this article, such party state shall construe the denominations and descriptions appearing in paragraph "a" hereof as being applicable to and identifying those offenses or violations of a substantially similar nature, and the laws of such party state shall contain such provisions as may be necessary to ensure that full force and effect is given to this article.

5.  Article V -- Applications for new licenses.  Upon application for a license to drive, the licensing authority in a party state shall ascertain whether the applicant has ever held, or is the holder of a license to drive issued by any other party state. The licensing authority in the state where application is made shall not issue a license to drive to the applicant if:

a.  The applicant has held such a license, but the same has been suspended by reason, in whole or in part, of a violation and if such suspension period has not terminated.

b.  The applicant has held such a license, but the same has been revoked by reason, in whole or in part, of a violation and if such revocation has not terminated, except that after the expiration of one year from the date the license was revoked, such person may make application for a new license if permitted by law. The licensing authority may refuse to issue a license to any such applicant if, after investigation, the licensing authority determines that it will not be safe to grant to such person the privilege of driving a motor vehicle on the public highways.

c.  The applicant is the holder of a license to drive issued by another party state and currently in force unless the applicant surrenders such license.

6.  Article VI -- Applicability of other laws.  Except as expressly required by provisions of this compact, nothing contained herein shall be construed to affect the right of any party state to apply any of its other laws relating to licenses to drive to any person or circumstance, nor to invalidate or prevent any driver license agreement or other cooperative arrangement between a party state and a nonparty state.

7.  Article VII -- Compact administrator and interchange of information.

a.  The head of the licensing authority of each party state shall be the administrator of this compact for that state. The administrators, acting jointly, shall have the power to formulate all necessary and proper procedures for the exchange of information under this compact.

b.  The administrator of each party state shall furnish to the administrator of each other party state any information or documents reasonably necessary to facilitate the administration of this compact.

8.  Article VIII -- Entry into force and withdrawal.

a.  This compact shall enter into force and become effective as to any state when it has enacted the same into law.

b.  Any party state may withdraw from this compact by enacting a statute repealing the same, but no such withdrawal shall take effect until six months after the executive head of the withdrawing state has given notice of the withdrawal to the executive heads of all other party states. No withdrawal shall affect the validity or applicability by the licensing authorities of states remaining party to the compact of any report of conviction occurring prior to the withdrawal.

9.  Article IX -- Construction and severability.  This compact shall be liberally construed so as to effectuate the purposes thereof. The provisions of this compact shall be severable.

Appendix G

Iowa Code 321.205 Conviction or administrative decision in another jurisdiction.
The department is authorized to suspend or revoke the driver’s license of a resident of this state or disqualify a resident of this state from operating a commercial motor vehicle for any of the following reasons:

1.  Upon receiving notice of the conviction of the resident in another state for an offense which, if committed in this state, would be grounds for the suspension or revocation of the license or disqualification of the person from operating a commercial motor vehicle.

2.  Upon receiving notice of a final administrative decision in another state that the resident has acted in a manner which would be grounds for suspension or revocation of the license or disqualification of the person from operating a commercial motor vehicle in this state.

761 - 615.30 (321)
Revocation for out-of-state offense.
615.30(1)

The department may revoke an Iowa resident’s license when the department is notified by another state that the person committed an offense in that state which, if committed in Iowa, would be grounds for revocation. The notice may indicate either a conviction or a final administrative decision. The period of the revocation shall be the same as if the offense had occurred in Iowa.
615.30(2)

Rescinded IAB 11/20/96, effective 12/25/96.
This rule is intended to implement Iowa Code section 321.205.